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Natives in The Hop Fields

1880

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
In the 1880s Native Americans from Washington, Canada and Alaska became a valuable resource in Eastern Washington’s hop fields, almost exclusively making up the work force. A migration took place every year by foot, wagon, horseback or canoe bringing thousands of Duwamish, Sammamish, Lummi, Tligngits, and Haidas to the fields. It was an empowering time for Native laborers who were valued by farmers for their work ethic and for being native, and not Chinese for whom public anti-sentiment was growing strong. This gave them an edge in negotiating wages and
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Logging Industry in Washington

1890

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Logging was one of the first industries to appear in Washington. As the demand for lumber grew, the forests and lumber mills of Washington also elevated in national prominence. This resulted in a rapid growth of laborers in this dangerous and grueling industry. Limbs and lives were at stake. The treacherous working conditions and long hours of labor prompted workers to unite and fight for better wages and safety standards.   Before the logging boom hit the Evergreen State, the emerald forests of
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The Knights of Labor and the Colored National Labor Union

1917

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The Knights of Labor and the Colored National Labor Union both emerged in 1869 when workers banded together to stand up against the relentless unjust labor treatment they were experiencing. This shared sentiment of unjust worker rights and treatment echoed across the minds of black and white laborers. Their activism, along with the protest and movements of many other labor organizations has led to the many workplace rights we today take for granted.   The early founders and leaders of the Knights of
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Cascade Tunnel

1897

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
In the summer of 1897 construction began on a new railway tunnel in the Cascades by Stevens Pass. The previous track had been full of dangerous switchbacks and situated in an area at high risk for avalanches. It took three years to build and was 2.6 miles long when completed. Though built to avoid disasters the tragedy of the cascade tunnel is that it led to the deadliest avalanche in US history. In February of 1910 an unrelenting blizzard hit the Cascades, blocking the tunnel’s entrance and exit. Two trains, Spokane local passenger train No. 25 and Fast
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Chinese Expulsion Queen of the Pacific

1885

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Following the Civil War and mass loss of American lives, the Gold Rush and westward expansion made the influx of an immigrant workforce a welcomed necessity. In Washington, Chinese immigrants came to work on the expanding railroads, coal, lumber, hop fields and fisheries. As the boom began to slow they moved into the cities, paving Seattle’s sidewalks, streets and setting up their own small business. Their welcome turned sour in the 1880s when economic tough times and the Chinese Exclusion Act made them an easy scapegoat for job shortages. Cultural
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Roslyn Coal Miners Strike

1886

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Roslyn, Washington is a town that was built by the coal industry. Although it may be small, the coal workers of Roslyn were in the forefront of enacting labor changes for the greater welfare of those who worked the mines.   Only two years after the establishment of Roslyn with the arrival of the Northern Pacific Coal Company in 1886, the coal miners began to push for a shorter eight-hour workday instead of the 10 to 11 working hours that was considered the norm. The workers went on strike and the
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The Longshore Workers Strikes

1934

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The longshore strike of 1934 has come to be known as the Great Strike in the years that have passed. This strike of the working longshoremen was great in the number of supporters and in the number of days it lasted. At the end of the 83-day strike, not only were workers’ requests met, their actions of unity crossed the color line and ended in a subsequent victory began a new age of the modern labor movement in the Western United States.     The several smaller strikes that occurred in the years
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Mother Jones

1914

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Mary Haris, more commonly known as Mother Jones, tirelessly spent her life traveling the nation fighting for workers’ rights and in protest of child labor. The U.S Attorney general called her the most dangerous woman in America. She inspired and rallied workers to fight for their rights and was jailed numerous times for her work. In May of 1914 she came to Seattle and participated in a parade of remembrance of all the lives lost in the fight for workers and labor organizations. The parade was composed of around 30 various unions and 7,000 members. Mother
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Seattle Shipbuilding Industry and Unions

1890

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Boat building is a tradition in the Pacific Northwest that has roots that date back hundreds of years before the earliest white settlers arrived in Seattle. The 1897 Klondike gold rush in Alaska helped establish a new shipbuilding history in Seattle that lingered on through World Wars I and II. Shipbuilders and their unions were pioneers in calling for labor rights of all working people and their actions and ideas helped fan the flame that led to one of the largest labor strikes in American history. The
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Shantytowns on the Shorelines of Seattle

1930

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Seattle’s reputation for being a boom-and-bust economy, the end of World War I, and the Great Depression changed the shorelines of the Puget Sound dramatically. Ports and shipyards that were once busy and filled with workers were replaced by thousands of jobless and homeless men. Industry was exchanged with crops of shanty and shack towns that seemed to appear overnight on the shores of Seattle. After World War I, reduction in the lumber and shipbuilding industry was seen in the 1920s. The stock market crash in
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Great Seattle Fire of 1889

1889

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
On the 6th of June in a small cabinet making shop John Back was heating glue over a gas fire. When the hot glue boiled over it caught fire to wood chips on the floor and began to spread fast. By the time the firefighters got there, 30 minutes later, it was too late exploding the nearby liquor store and saloons. Seattle’s water supply was privately owned by Spring Hill Water Company, whose small wooden pipes and low water pressure failed the city in its hour of need. As the fire
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Fishing and Cannery Industry: Unloading of the Fishermen’s Boats

1880

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The advent of industrial fish canning brought forth a newly introduced appetite for the salmon of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. Cannery owners followed salmon up north and the fishermen trailed right behind. The fishermen were primarily comprised of white immigrant workers and fueled by their goal of excluding Chinese workers from their field, they began to organize unions partly because of racism. The Columbia River Fishermen’s Protective Union (CRFPU) was formed in 1880 and they were successful in their
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Everett Massacre

1888

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
On November 5th, 1916 250 men packed aboard the steamers Verona and Calista and sailed from Seattle to fight for their right to free speech and to help striking shingle workers in Everett.  Five of them would never make it back.  These men, from the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), though not part of the AFL
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Filipino Cannery Workers

1880

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
After a series of Asian exclusion acts in the United States, Filipino workers came to find themselves working in the canneries of the Washington and Alaska coast. From the demanding and grueling work in the cannery industry came the first Filipino-led labor union in the United States. Not only was this union the first to be led by Filipino workers, but it was also the first cannery labor union to form in the country.      Cannery work was cold, wet, dirty, dangerous, and came with very low wages. It was so
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Seattle General Strike

1919

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
In February of 1919 Seattle held one of the nation’s first citywide general strikes setting the stage for post-WWI labor activism. During the war, wages had been strictly controlled by the federal government in wartime production sectors but were promised to rise after the conflict ended. When shipyard workers requested the government to fulfill its promise, raising wages for unskilled workers as well as skilled, they were refused. Union membership had experienced unprecedented growth during the war and this was its first big test. The strike began with the
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I.W.W Free Speech Fight in Spokane

1909

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
In 1909 Spokane became the battlegrounds for free speech drawing the attention of the nation. Spokane’s employment agencies had set up a system to take advantage of workers by charging them to find work, retaining them for a day, firing them and charging again to find a new position.  I.W.W organizer James Walsh arrived and redirected the angry workers into his organization, setting up lectures, a union hall and Industrial Worker newspaper. In response to the I.W.W activism and recruitment, the employment agencies encouraged the city council
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Anna Louise Strong, organizer of Seattle General Strike

1919

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Anna Louise Strong still reigns as Seattle’s most notable and famous radical. This title was achieved by her tenacious passion in advocating the need of social justice for children, women, and the working class. Strong used the power of her pen and the press to rally the workers of Seattle to unite in solidarity in the days leading up to the General Strike of 1919. Strong also holds the distinction of being the first woman to be elected onto the Seattle School Board. She was favored strongly for this position
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Women Protesting for the Eight-Hour Workday

1900

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Washington State was one of the first in the nation to grant working women an eight-hour workday. This quest was sparked by the organization of a 23-year-old Seattle waitress and her fellow union members. It is activism like theirs that proves to all people across the nation that women can change the course of labor history. The labor activist Rose Schneiderman poetically said: What the woman who labors wants is the right to live, not simply exist — the right to
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Women Suffragists and the Right to Vote

1883

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Washington State was in the forefront in spearheading the women’s suffrage movement and helped lead the amendment for women’s right to vote in the United States. Women in Washington first received the right to vote in 1883 and when their right was taken away, women and “broad-minded” men did not relinquish their fight. Women in Washington gained the right to vote in 1883 with the support of farmers in the state’s legislature. In the 1884 election, women voters outnumbered the men. The votes women casted
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Centralia Massacre

1919

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The I.W.W, International Wobblies of the World, had long been unwelcome in Centralia. They arrived early in the 1900s, largely unemployed and homeless, setting up their hall in the heart of lumber territory. The citizens of Centralia, viewing them as unpatriotic radicals, attempted to remove them a few times through force, raids and destruction of their hall. On November 11th 1919, during the Armistice Day Parade, Wobblies knew an attack was eminent and on the advice of their lawyer
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Battle at Congdon Orchards

1933

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The Yakima Valley 1933 conflict was one of the most publicized agricultural labor disturbances in Washington history. The central issue in Spring of 1933 was the question of low wages.  Growers enforced 10 hour workdays at 10 cents an hour for men and 8 cents an hour for women.  In May 1933, The Agricultural Workers Industrial Union No. 110, met for several days, deciding on May 15 to demand 35 cents an hour and an eight-hour workday.  When the IWW led a strike of hop pickers in Yakima at Congdon Orchards in
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New Deal

1933

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Of all of Roosevelt’s New Deal programs, the Works Progress Administration is the most famous, because it affected so many peoples’ lives. Roosevelt’s vision of a work-relief program employed more than 8.5 million people. For an average salary of $41.57 a month, WPA employees built bridges, roads, public buildings, public parks and airports. Under the direction of Harry Hopkins, an enthusiastic ex-social worker who had come from modest means, the WPA would spend more than $11 million in employment relief before it was canceled in 1943. The work relief
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Grand Coulee Dam built

1933

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Grand Coulee is the largest dam in the Columbia River Basin and one of the largest in the world. Everything about the dam is large: it is 550 feet (167.6 meters) tall, measured from its foundation in solid granite, or approximately 350 feet (106.7 meters) from the downstream river surface to the top of the dam. It is 5,223 feet (1,592 meters) long, or 57 feet short of a mile. Grand Coulee Dam is the largest concrete structure ever built. Hydropower accounts for 79.7 percent of Grand Coulee’s authorized purposes, the others being irrigation and flood control
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The Railway Labor Act of 1926

1926

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The enactment of the Railway Labor Act in 1926 served multiple purposes. This new act required railway employers to bargain collectively and prohibited them from discriminating against unions. This allowed for prompt resolutions of disputes and avoided any interruption of interstate commerce. This was a win for workers, employers, and the growing economy of the United States. The Railway Labor Act (RLA) helped to facilitate the quick resolution of union and employer disagreements with its mandatory and carefully outlined set of procedures and course of actions to take. The RLA and
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Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters

1925

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) was a labor union organized by African American employees of the Pullman Company in August 1925 and led by A. Philip Randolph and Milton P. Webster. Over the next twelve years, the BSCP fought a three-front battle against the Pullman Company, the American Federation of Labor, and the anti-union, pro-Pullman sentiments of the majority of the black community. Largely successful on each front, the BCSP is a significant institution in both the labor and civil rights history of the twentieth century United States.   The BSCP faced
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Unemployed Citizens League

1926

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation

TBD

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Jackson Street

1918

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Seattle’s local music scene and culture was brought to life by the sounds of jazz on Jackson Street in the early 1900s. At the turn of the century more than 75,000 immigrants and migrants came to Seattle altering Seattle’s cultural and racial makeup. They settled south of Yesler on Jackson Street where cheap hotels, bars, pool halls, shops and brothels were set up to accommodate the needs of the growing population. It was here, in 1918 that the very first local jazz band, Miss Lilian Smith’s Jazz Band, played to raise money for the NAACP kicking off an
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Japanese Incarceration During World War II

1942

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The lives of Japanese Americans in the United States were forever changed when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 amid World War I. The United States declared war with Japan and overnight, those who were once considered neighbors and friends became enemies of the nation. In a matter of months, the United States government uprooted Japanese American families from their homes and forced them to live out the next several years in barren and isolated internment camps. Despite these dark years, the interned Japanese Americans remained strong in spirit
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WPA Mural Artists

1933

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
During the Great Depression, efforts were made to provide economic relief to artists who were having trouble finding work. Relief was brought in by way of newly developed government programs that provided artists with work as they painted the story of America across the country. These programs raised the nation’s cultural awareness through high quality artwork while simultaneously celebrating the ideals of community, democracy, and hard work. The short lived Public Works of Art Project (PWAP) ushered in the
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Newspaper Strike

1953

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
On July 16th  1953, Local 82, the American newspaper guild, went on strike with 250 writers and editors from the Seattle Times walking out. They were joined by other craft unions on contract with the paper including web pressman, mailers, stereotypes, photoengravers and typographers.  The Seattle Times was forced
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Rosie the Riveter

1945

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Rosie the Riveter shown building Boeing plane, with a row of planes in her background, with women entering the industrial workforce after WWII.  Florise Spearman is hired by Boeing, and is their first black and first woman employee. Four women are shown with the parts of the planes, being bolted and welded, as frames around their life experience. There was an opportunity for women to enter the workforce that came about during the second world war, but that was swept away as soon as men returned from battle. The effort to preserve fair and equal
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Ironworkers and Steelworkers Union

1896

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
By the end of the 19th century, the architectural landscape of metropolitan cities across the world underwent a transition. Buildings and bridges were now planted with iron and steel. The seeds and growth of industry summoned a demand for workers who could skillfully handle and herd these new building materials.      The International Association of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers of America was established in 1896. Ironworkers soon came to be known as “cowboys of the sky.” Brave and daring
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Electrical Workers Union

1891

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers was founded 1891 shortly after businesses and homes in the United States began to be wired for electricity. Much of the success of the industries that stimulated the growth of the nation depended on the work of those who worked in the dangerous trade of raising power poles and connecting power lines. Electrical workers acted collectedly to bring higher safety and living standards to their trade and developed apprenticeship programs that created workers with high skills.
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Tyree Scott at a Central Contractors Association Rally

1969

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Tyree Scott is shown standing on a podium addressing a Central Contractors Association rally at the University of Washington in 1969 while demonstrators push over construction machinery in protest. Actions like this closed constructions sites across Seattle and united union and non-union workers as they came together in solidarity to fight for equal rights. As a prominent labor leader of the Seattle founded Central Contractors Association (CCA), Tyree Scott was frustrated with the difficulty black contractors had
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Civil Rights Movement – March on Washington

1963

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
On the landmark day of August 28, 1963, over 250,000 peaceful civil rights protesters gathered in Washington, D.C. for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The event focused on employment discrimination, civil rights abuses against African Americans and other disenfranchised groups, and played a pivotal role in winning the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom was also where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his moving and inspirational
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Black Panther Party Housing Rights Protest

1966

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The Black Panther Party established its Seattle chapter in the spring of 1968. In its decade long existence in Seattle, reminders of the community programs the Black Panthers initiated the Central District still have a presence today in the neighborhood. This was radical within the Party and the Seattle Black Panthers made a major impact on the region. The Seattle chapter of the Black Panther Party (BPP) was started two years after the Party was founded in Oakland, California in 1966. It has the distinction of
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Unification of Different unions shown through the trades uniting in the leaders of LELO

1973

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
(Labor and Employment Law Office, a union of the UCWA, UFW, and Alaska Cannery Workers Association) – In 1973 the United construction Workers Association, the Alaska Cannery Workers Association, and the United Farmer Workers of Washington State established LELO as a racial and economic justice workers’ rights 501c3 nonprofit organization. As an organization led by ordinary workers, we develop the leadership of those most marginalized in our society: people of color, working class women, recent immigrants and LGBTQ (lesbian/ gay/bisexual/
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THE UFW and Farmer Workers Strikes

1965

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
Beginning of Ethical Reform of migratory workers The farmworkers movement closely coincided with early stages of the Chicano Pride movement.  Today, the farmworkers’ movement overlaps with the fight for immigration reform and migrant workers’ rights.  The struggle to win rights for farmworkers is often a fight for some of the most marginalized in our country.   On September 8, 1965, Filipino American grape workers, members of the Agricultural Workers Organizing
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Fort Lawton Takeover

1970

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
In March of 1970 the United Indian People’s Council decided to adopt a more militant protest method through civil disobedience in order to support and empower urban native populations and reclaim land. When army Fort Lawton, in modern day Discovery Park, was declared “surplus land,” Native American activists decided to pursue it for a cultural and educational center for Native studies. They aimed to provide resources and support for the 4,000 disenfranchised Native Americans not living on reservations and no longer
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Coalition of Labor Union Women (CLUW)

1974

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The founding members of the Coalition of Labor Union Women wanted to create an organization that empowered and amplified the voices of working women. Although the Coalition was founded on the primary goals of unifying working women and to eliminate discrimination in the workplace, their actions over the years have encompassed and accomplished so much more. Their fight for workplace rights have benefited all workers and their families. On March 24, 1974, over 3,000 women from over 50 unions and 41 states assembled
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Kingdome / International District Protests

1972

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
On a November day in 1972, protesters holding signs stating, “Hum Bao, Not Hot Dogs!” made their way to the groundbreaking site that would soon house the Kingdome. This moment of protest caught the attention of the public and ignited interest in the welfare and residents of the International District. What began as an unrehearsed demonstration by the Asian American community in Seattle evolved into something far greater.   The small group of 40 demonstrators who gathered in the International District
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Cannery Leaders Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes

1973

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The lives of Filipino Americans Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes may have been short lived, but their legacy lives on with friends, family, the community, and with future labor activists. Let us remember Silme and Gene for the lasting impact they made with their labor and social justice activism and not for their tragic deaths. Gene Viernes, a state wrestling champion who attended Central Washington State College on an athletic scholarship, began working in Alaskan salmon canneries with his father and brothers at
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Oil Refinery Fires in Anacortes

1988

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
The lives of thirteen oil refinery workers were suddenly taken away in two of Washington state’s deadliest industrial workplace disasters. These lives are gone, but the oil refinery still stands and operates with little interruption. The fight for safety in the workplace affects us all and is a matter a of life and death. On November 25, 1998, an explosion and fire erupts at the Equilon Puget Sound Refinery in Anacortes, Washington. This explosion killed six refinery workers and Equilon ultimately accepted
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WTO Protests 1999

1999

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
In 1999, when the World Trade Organization held their third ministerial conference in Seattle, the entire globe turned their attention toward the Emerald City. World Trade Organization meetings were disrupted as labor and environmental activists marched together in protest against the deregulation of international trade and commerce. These five days of demonstrations have come to be known as the “Battle in Seattle.” The activists who protested helped bring local and global awareness to issues that not only affected all workers, but the environment as well
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Mural Sponsors

2017

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation

List of Mural Sponsors

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Seattle’s May Day Immigration Parade on Jackson Street

1919

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation
May 1st is celebrated around the world as International Workers Day and the workers of Seattle have been demonstrating on this day since 1919. Working people share common struggles that transcends borders and history. We all have hopes of providing a better life for ourselves and our family. No matter where we hail from, when exclusionary policies are used to advance aggressive anti-worker policy, all workers must stand in unity and reject the efforts to divide us. The banners and signs held by activists on May
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Mural Sponsors

2017

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation

List of Mural Sponsors

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The Future

2017

Historical Context
Artist Interpretation

To Be Determined…

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Jackson Street Workers Mural Instructions

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Hello and welcome to the Jackson Street Mural Viewer page! Below you will find instructions for how to navigate the murals as well as an understanding supplementary text and audio specific around specific events located throughout the mural
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event content and what to look for As you scroll through the mural, you will notice specifc dates with titles of events. Click on the titiles to pull up additional content. Written information is split into the historical context and the artists interpretation, toggle through both with buttons located at the top of the content. Audio content is provided at the bottom of the slide in.
1880-Natives in The Hop Fields
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1890-Logging Industry in Washington
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1917-The Knights of Labor and the Colored National Labor Union
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1897-Cascade Tunnel
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1885-Chinese Expulsion Queen of the Pacific
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1886-Roslyn Coal Miners Strike
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1934-The Longshore Workers Strikes
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1914-Mother Jones
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1890-Seattle Shipbuilding Industry and Unions
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1930-Shantytowns on the Shorelines of Seattle
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1889-Great Seattle Fire of 1889
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1880-Fishing and Cannery Industry: Unloading of the Fishermen’s Boats
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1888-Everett Massacre
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1880-Filipino Cannery Workers
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1919-Seattle General Strike
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1909-I.W.W Free Speech Fight in Spokane
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1919-Anna Louise Strong, organizer of Seattle General Strike
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1900-Women Protesting for the Eight-Hour Workday
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1883-Women Suffragists and the Right to Vote
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1919-Centralia Massacre
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1933-Battle at Congdon Orchards
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1933-New Deal
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1933-Grand Coulee Dam built
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1926-The Railway Labor Act of 1926
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1925-Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
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1926-Unemployed Citizens League
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1918-Jackson Street
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1942-Japanese Incarceration During World War II
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1933-WPA Mural Artists
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1953-Newspaper Strike
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1945-Rosie the Riveter
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1896-Ironworkers and Steelworkers Union
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1891-Electrical Workers Union
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1969-Tyree Scott at a Central Contractors Association Rally
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1963-Civil Rights Movement – March on Washington
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1966-Black Panther Party Housing Rights Protest
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1973-Unification of Different unions shown through the trades uniting in the leaders of LELO
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1965-THE UFW and Farmer Workers Strikes
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1970-Fort Lawton Takeover
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1974-Coalition of Labor Union Women (CLUW)
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1972-Kingdome / International District Protests
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1973-Cannery Leaders Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes
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1988-Oil Refinery Fires in Anacortes
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1999-WTO Protests 1999
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2017-Mural Sponsors
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1919-Seattle’s May Day Immigration Parade on Jackson Street
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2017-Mural Sponsors
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2017-The Future
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1800s to 1900s1900s to 1960s1960s to 20002000s to 2017